Opposed to 1% Local Option Sales Tax

I would like to thank our Town Meeting Reps and the Brattleboro Selectboard for reviewing and reconsidering the support of the 1% Local Option Sales Tax. 

I would like to express my opposition to this as a resident that has owned and operated small businesses here in Brattleboro spanning over the last 13 years. At this point it is no secret that running a business in Southern Vermont is a very difficult thing to do. And yes, it may seem that one penny on one dollar or bringing the Brattleboro sales tax from 6% up to 7% may not be a big deal but it really is. Right now, with every business in town competing with online retailers like Amazon, or watching potential customers go across the river to tax free New Hampshire, I feel strongly that this is not a beneficial option for the town nor to the businesses in Brattleboro.


Brattleboro Committee Meeting Agendas

The Brattleboro Arts Committee will meet on Wednesday, February 20, 2019, at 1:00pm in the Hanna Cosman Meeting Room at the Municipal Center.

The Brattleboro Traffic Safety Committee will meet on Thursday, February 21, 2019, at 8:00am in the Selectboard Meeting Room at the Municipal Center.

The Brattleboro Representative Town Meeting Finance Committee will meet on Thursday, February 21, 2019, at 5:30pm in the Cusick Conference Room (2ndfloor) of the Windham Regional Career Center, located at 80 Atwood Street.


Local Option Tax Increases Brattleboro Revenue, But Property Taxes Will Still Rise

At Tuesday’s special meeting, the Brattleboro Selectboard discussed adding a 1% Local Option Sales Tax (LOST) to items purchased in the ‘boro. Adding this additional revenue stream to the Town coffers has been attempted before. Most recently it barely passed as an advisory vote, but was ultimately rejected.

The main argument in favor of the tax usually involves the expected revenue. In 2015, the estimate was $600,000. This, in theory, could offset property taxes by that amount.

But, taxpayers have seen these property tax reducing “deals” many times before, and property taxes do not go down. Spending rises to meet the new income.